Intro

Research Group: Imaging in Neurodegenerative Diseases

Our main research topic is the identification of disease-specific neuroimaging biomarkers in neurodegenerative diseases, through innovative neuroimaging methods and their correlations with clinical and genetic parameters. Our aim is to obtain a better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and enable patients a better risk and progression prognosis. This work is performed in the framework of the Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA-BRAIN) in close collaboration with the Research Centre Jülich.

Founded by:
Gefördert von 

Research projects

Huntington's Disease

Huntington's disease is a degenerative brain disease for which a cure has not yet been found. With the help of cutting-edge imaging techniques, JARA-BRAIN scientists analyse the brain structure and brain activity and how they change during the course of the disease in affected patients.

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Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most frequent age-related neurodegenerative disorder. It is mainly characterized by progressive dopaminergic neuron loss in . . .

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REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) is a sleep disorder that involves abnormal beahvior during the sleep phase with rapid eye movement sleep.

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Dementia

During the last years real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an established and powerful tool in research on neurofeedback . . .

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Ataxia

Friedreich’s Ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive, spinocerebellar disorder and the most common of inherited ataxias. This severely debilitating disease leads to the loss of the ability to walk, and sometimes to cardiomyopathy, . . .

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Metabolic Imaging in Neurodegenerative Diseases

It is well acknowledged that in neurodegenerative diseases there is a long period of time before diagnosable signs and symptoms emerge. Nevertheless, neuropathological changes, metabolic and functional alterations of specific brain areas may occur many years, . . .

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